Part P of the Building regulations

October 6, 2008

Part P of the Building regulations was introduced in 2005.The Purpose of Part P was to bring Electrical Installations under the remit of the Building Control offices. As with many other types of construction the Electrical system, since Part p, has to be verified by a local Building Control office or by a part P registered company or individual.

A company that has become Part P Registered can only verify work that they have actually installed.

In the case of a building control verified Electrical Installation the installation is inspected at a number of times during the installation process. The timings of these inspections are normally arranged so that any parts of the installation that will be concealed on completion of the installation are inspected while Visible.

It is a fact that must be considered when notifying building control as any part of the installation that cannot be- inspected may cause the installation to fail Part P and have to be inspected again. Concealed parts of the installation would then have to be revealed to allow inspection to be carried out

Most building control offices are now using contractors to inspect installations for Part p compliance. This has caused a lot of controversy within the Electrical industry as In some circumstances rival companies have inspected the work of competitors. It also raises questions on why it is allowable in these Circumstances but not others.

The IEE Wiring Regulations BS 7671 2008, 17th Edition

November 27, 2008

The wiring regulations have been in existence since 1882. They were created to help with safety in lighting circuits with specific attention to the risk presented by fire. The title of the 1st edition was in fact ‘Rules and Regulations for the prevention of Fire Risks Arising from Electric Lighting’

Since 1882 there have been 17 editions of the wiring regulations. All these editions have been released with the safety aspect of installations been the main consideration. The actual full term used in the latest wiring regulations, the 17th edition, is “Safety of persons, livestock and property against dangers and damage which may arise in the reasonable use of electrical installations”

The editions of the wiring regulations are updated when the 5th supplement or amendment is due. These supplements are referred to as amendments. For example the 16 th edition went through 4 amendments before the 17th edition was issued. These amendments were issued in 1994, 1997, 2001 and 2004. At each amendment the colour of the cover of the wiring regulations is changed. For example the covers on the above amendments started as red in 1992, green in 1994, yellow in 1997 blue in 2001 and brown in 2004. The 17th edition’s cover is red.

Reasons for the amendments are varied but in the case of the most recent editions and amendments it was the need to adopt a common standard for the European Union that have driven the changes. BS7671 will be updated as the European document is either amended or revised. The European document is referred to as CENELEC Document.

The legal status of the wiring regulations is referred to as non-statutory. This means that BS7671 taken in isolation is not actually enforceable by law. BS7671 is however reference in the Electricity at work regulations 1989 and also Part P of the building regulations. These are legally enforceable regulations. The reference to BS7671 is to suggest that following the practices laid out in BS7671 the Wiring Regulations, would indicate that good practice has been followed.

In the event of any legal challenge in regards to the standard of work carried out within any Electrical installation, references to the Wiring Regulations could and would be used. BS7671 is therefore a reference to good practices. It would however be very foolish to undertake any work on an Electrical installation with out a good understanding of the current wiring regulations which at this time is BS7671:2008 IEE wiring regulations 17th edition